Tag Archives: co-parenting

Overcoming Common Co-Parenting Issues After a Divorce

Divorce is an emotional and confusing time for your children. After your divorce, effective co-parenting is critical for their wellbeing. You and your ex-spouse will need to use patience and problem-solving to ensure you’re able to work together.

Common Co-Parenting Issues & How to Overcome Them

There’s bound to be some growing pains while you and your ex-spouse figure out what life looks like after divorce. After all, you’ll both need to coordinate schedules and make decisions regarding your children. This is where some of the most common co-parenting issues arise.

1. Negative Talk

Divorce is stressful, which often results in anger and heightened emotion. Some parents may be shocked to hear their child relay that their ex-spouse has been speaking negatively about them when they’re not around.

This type of behavior confuses your child and may leave them to feel at-fault. They may also feel the need to choose between their parents.

It’s important to keep the issues you have with your ex between the two of you. Don’t use your children as a buffer or expect them to relay messages on your behalf.

2. Schedule Changes

Two different schedules will need to entwine to meet the needs of your children. And when changes occur, it could result in less parenting time and frustration. It’s best to communicate schedule changes with your ex-spouse as far in advance as possible.

For example, if you wish to take your child on an extended vacation, discuss it with your ex first. If your work schedule changes, tell your ex as soon as possible. You can then work together to come up with a plan.

Some changes, such as work schedule changes, may necessitate a custody modification. Reach out to your attorney if you feel your custody or parenting plan needs to change.

3. Lack of Cooperation

Unfortunately, some couples find it difficult to co-parent. One ex-spouse may be completely uncooperative when it comes to communication and the parenting plan. If this is the case for you, it’s important to remember that you can’t control your ex’s actions—you can only control your own.

Disagreements will happen, especially at first. You should expect to work through them together by communicating and sharing your concerns. If your ex refuses to co-parent, we recommend reaching out to an attorney for help.

Call Schneider Law Firm, P.C. in Ft. Worth Today

The attorneys at Schneider Law Firm, P.C. have years of experience supporting clients going through divorce and co-parenting. To learn more about effective co-parenting or for support with custody modifications, give our Ft. Worth office a call at 817-755-1852 or send us a message.

Co-Parenting Babies and Toddlers

Every family is different. Parents must learn to co-parent together outside of marriage when their child is still very young. In those cases, it’s a good idea to talk with your lawyer about what’s best for your family. Babies and toddlers have needs and abilities different from those of an older child. 

Co-Parenting When a Child Is Under Three Years Old

In most cases involving children and divorce, courts believe that something called a Standard Possession Order is in the best interests of a child. A Standard Possession Order is intended to protect the best interests of children when determining how the non-custodial parent (the parent the children don’t live with) spends time with them. It generally lists what weekdays, weekends and holidays both parents can have with their children.

Texas law, however, says that Standard Possession Orders are not meant for children less than three years old. Instead, Texas courts consider a series of factors, including things like:

  • The physical, medical, behavioral and developmental needs of the child
  • The effect on the child of separation from either parent
  • The caregiving provided to the child before the current custody lawsuit
  • The child’s need for routine
  • The age of the child

Things to Consider When Co-Parenting a Very Young Child

When you and your ex break up or divorce while your child is very young, the child will never remember that you were ever together. What they will remember is that you and the other parent worked together to give your child the best life possible–that you loved him or her and treated each other with respect.

Respectful co-parenting means choosing to work together, even when you disagree. It means communicating about your baby’s needs or toddler’s needs and making sure to involve both parents as those needs change. This is especially important when caring for a young child who can’t effectively communicate their needs and who is growing quickly.

To make successful co-parenting happen, many experts recommend arranging short and frequent visits with the non-custodial parent. For young children, they’re less stressful than long, overnight visits. A schedule for a young child might plan for a few hours a few times a week. Time can and should be extended as the child grows older.

Co-Parenting Babies and Toddlers | Schneider Law Firm, P.C. | iStock-619735158
817-799-7125 – When a child is under three, courts do not necessarily order visitation as they do for older children. Here are some things to consider when co-parenting a very young child.

Get Help With Child Custody. Contact an Attorney.

Of course, every family’s needs are different. It’s best to talk with a lawyer about yours. If you need legal help with co-parenting a baby or toddler, you can start by calling the Arlington office of the Schneider Law Firm, P.C., at 817-799-7125. Our Texas divorce lawyers are here to support you.

Source:

http://www.txaccess.org/informal-out-court-agreements-children-birth-3-years-old