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5 Myths About Divorce You Shouldn’t Believe

Divorce can be a trying process. It can be especially confusing and hurtful when misinformation and myths taint your outlook on divorce. To protect your mindset, there are some myths you must stop believing now.

1. My Spouse Is At-Fault, So I’ll Walk Away With Everything

We know this is an emotional time. It’s normal to want to retaliate against someone who hurt you. Yet, in Texas, marital property belongs to both you and your spouse—no matter who’s at fault. Trust that the court will work to divide your assets equitably and fairly.

2. The Court Always Favors the Mother When Making Custody Decisions

The court will do what they feel is in the best interest of the child. In many cases, the mother has been the primary caregiver for the child, resulting in the mother being chosen for custody. Yet, the court doesn’t favor one party over the other. Instead, they’ll consider all facts before making a decision.

3. Keeping Property in My Name Will Protect It From Division

Separate property is property you acquired before the marriage. While it may be protected in divorce, you risk losing it if you commingle it with marital property. For example, if you use your inheritance to purchase your marital home, those funds are no longer separate. 

Regardless of whose name is on a title or loan, you’ll still have marital interest. It’s up to the court to decide how to divide all marital property.

4. I Need My Spouse’s Approval Before Getting a Divorce

Many years ago, the court required you to have spouse approval before getting a divorce. Now, one spouse can file for a contested divorce. There is no legal requirement stating your spouse must agree to the divorce for the court to grant it.

5. I Can Get Divorced Without the Help of an Attorney

Many DIY solutions exist in the legal industry, especially for divorce. Yet, divorces are difficult and complex situations that require a professional to best protect your interests. A divorce attorney can help you decide which steps are best for you to take and fight on your behalf.

Questions About Divorce? Let the Schneider Law Firm Team Help.

Each divorce is unique. You need the support of a professional attorney who can help protect you. To learn more about your divorce or to speak with an attorney, give our Arlington law firm a call at 817-799-7125 or send us a message.

Understanding the Different Types of Child Custody & Visitation

During a divorce with children, you and your ex-spouse must reach a custody agreement. If you and your ex cannot create an agreement on your own, the court will decide what type of child custody is best for your child, as well as any applicable visitation arrangements. 

Understanding Child Custody

There are two parts to child custody: include legal custody and physical custody. Let’s dive a bit deeper into both.

Legal Custody

Legal custody gives you the ability to make critical decisions on your child’s behalf. These decisions can include, for example, where your child will attend school and what doctor they’ll see. Legal custody can be given to one parent (sole) or both parents (joint). 

Physical Custody

Physical custody refers to where your child lives. For example, you may have sole physical custody, which means the child lives primarily with you and your ex-spouse has visitation rights. Or, you might share physical custody, which means the child lives with you part of the time and your ex-spouse part of the time. 

In some cases, custody arrangements include one parent with legal and physical custody. In other cases, both parents will share legal custody with one parent having physical custody. It all depends on what the court decides is best for your child.

What Types of Visitation Are Available?

If sole custody is included in your custody agreement, you or your ex-spouse will be awarded visitation, so that you may be with your child on a regular basis. There are two common visitation methods used frequently by the court:

  • Unsupervised visitation: In unsupervised visitation, the parent can take the child to their own home or on any outing without supervision.
  • Supervised visitation: Courts will sometimes order supervised visitation, which means the parent must visit their child while another adult is present. This adult may be someone appointed by the custodial parent or a social worker designated by the court.

Call the Team at Schneider Law Firm Today for Custody Help

Child custody can be difficult to understand on your own. If you’re considering a divorce, reach out for help. For answers to your questions or to speak with a divorce attorney today, give our Arlington law office a call at 817-799-7125 or send us a message.

How Property Is Divided During a Divorce in Texas

A divorce is a stressful time with many moving parts, including the division of property. If you’re considering a divorce, you might be wondering how your marital assets and property will be divided in court. States divide property using one of two methods: community property division and equitable division.

Texas Is a Community Property State

In Texas, property is divided using the community property method. This means that the property acquired during your marriage belongs to both you and your spouse and must be divided equally. 

What Is Separate Property?

The only property not eligible for division is separate property—property you or your spouse owned before the marriage. For example, if you receive an inheritance from a family member before the marriage, you’ll be able to keep it. Other examples of separate property include gifts and recoveries from individual legal proceedings.

For any property to be separate, you must prove it belongs to you in court. This may be as simple as providing bank statements or other documentation. In other cases, you may require the assistance of a divorce attorney.

The Division of Community Property

For property that’s considered community property, Texas law requires the court to divide the property fairly and equitably. There are many factors when considering who receives what portion. For example, the court will consider fault in the dissolution of marriage, child custody, employability of each spouse and more.

What About Our Family Business?

If you and your spouse’s business was created during your marriage, it’s eligible for equal division at the point of divorce. If it’s a small business such as a sole proprietorship, you may be able to keep your assets. Yet, if you own a corporation with many assets, it may need to be divided. The court will do what’s best for you and your business.

Allow Us to Help You Through Your Divorce

Property division can be tough, and you shouldn’t handle it on your own. Allow the team at Schneider Law Firm, P.C. help you through. To learn more about your divorce, give our Ft. Worth law office a call at 817-755-1852 or send us a message.